the no 'poo method

no, we're not constipated. yeah, we get that alot.

soft water + wax + 3 months of good results - options = what do
(misc) zef no
kriem
Hi!! My name is Meghan & I've been lurking this community for god knows how long. You guys don't know me, but you taught me and encouraged me to go shampoo-free this summer. My fairy god-LJ.

I'm finally making a post because everything's gone pear-shaped and I've gone through the archives/memories/tags as far back as about 7 years and can't find exactly what I'm looking for. I have some specific trouble with my hair now and I found a lot of advice, but not a lot of follow-up if it worked. (I hope this doesn't mean people gave up D:)

THE HISTORY, THE PROBLEM this is long forgive meCollapse )

I don't wanna give up :( I want it to be like it was before. So I'm imploring for help.

Thank you for reading!!

My Understanding, 2nd Edition
gatorgirl7563
This is my second edition of “My Understanding”, which is basically an expository essay I’ve written describing the basic ideas, science, terms, and ingredients involved with no poo. Most of this information was copied and pasted from snippets gotten off this site, so if you see something that looks familiar, don’t get paranoid or worry about memory problems. If something looks a little TOO familiar, then send me a comment containing a link to where you wrote the advice (to prove it’s yours) and tell me your preference about whether you want credit given to you in the essay or for it to be reworded so that it no longer resembles your advice.

If you disagree with one of my “facts”, tell me so I can do more research, please. Also, feel free to tell me about a detail or step I’ve left out or something I skipped altogether. If you know of another basic to add or an abbreviated acronym, feel free to tell me. Do you agree or disagree with anything? PLEASE GIVE ME FEEDBACK!


BS – baking soda
ACV – apple cider vinegar
WV – white vinegar
WO – water only
BBB – boar bristle brush
TTO – tea tree oil
EO – essential oil
CO – conditioner only
cone – silicone
CG – curly girly
SLSs – Sodium Lauryl/Laureth Sulfate
OCM – oil cleansing method
EVOO – extra virgin olive oil
GSE – grapefruit seed extract


People go no-poo for many different reasons - to save money, protect the environment, keep strange and unnatural chemicals off themselves, traditional hair care isn't working for them - but the goal is always the same - healthy, natural, great-looking hair at an affordable price, or, put another way, to have hair and a scalp that naturally maintains itself with the help of the fewest and most natural ingredients possible and looks great doing it.

The natural ph of your hair is 4. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PH) Substances with a ph less than 7 are said to be acidic and substances/mixtures with a ph greater than 7 are called basic or alkaline. Pure water's ph is 7 and hard water's ph can be as high as 9, which means that even pure water is basic compared to your hair. As a no poo-er, you want to keep your scalp's ph as close to 4 as possible, while at the same time it stays moisturized, shiny, strong, easy-to-untangle, supple, good volume, etc.

It's a balancing act. Each ingredient you use while trying to achieve your own unique hairy balance does at least one thing you like and, sometimes, has at least one effect on your hair you don't like. The ingredients interact with each other, too, not just with your scalp. For instance, acids like tea or lemon mixtures will speed up the release rate of dye in henna, or using vinegar after carelessly rinsing out baking soda can turn your head into a middle schooler’s volcanic science experiment.

Basic (aka alkaline) ingredients and mixtures are your cleansing shampoo, while acidic mixtures are your conditioner, bringing your hair back up to its normal acidity, making it shiny and untangle easily.

But what about frizzy-ness, dandruff, fluffy/limp, extra greasy or dry hair?

Well, that's when your other ingredients and how your basic ingredients and acidic ingredients interact matter.
Tea tree oil, jojoba oil, coconut oil, coconut milk, castor oil, grapeseed oil, safflower oil, olive oil, vitamin e oil, avocado, shea, aloe, essential oils like rosemary, orange, nettle, lemongrass, peppermint, spearmint, cinnamon, or soaking your rinse in the actual herbs and then filtering them out before use. There's castile soap, homemade soaps, Dr. Bronner's soaps and shampoos, silicone- and paraben-free shampoos and conditioners.

And, of course, your hair is unique. Its natural: color, texture, length, thickness (fine to thick), moisture level, shape (straight to curly), and porosity will determine how it looks and feels in reaction to the ingredients you put on your head. People with fine, dark hair know that a little bit of oil on the scalp is very obvious, while curly blonds can still look good with greasy hair. Your quality of water -- hard, soft, filtered, distilled, rain, boiled, salt – will also have a big effect on how your hair reacts to the ingredients. Same with harsh commercial dyes, natural henna dyes, and level of heat you subject your hair to. Your health, diet, medication, stress level, and the weather also have an effect on your hair. Activities like swimming in a chlorinated pool, or spending the day with the sun beating down on your unprotected head might make your next wash, rinse, or soak need a little extra something to return to normal.

In order to have a naturally self-maintaining head of hair, no poo-ers must check each ingredient to see if it passes the no poo tests in the first paragraph, rather than just blindly following an interesting-looking recipe he or she found online. Instead of continually doing X, Y, and Z, even when your routine isn’t no longer working, no poo-ers must put mixtures on their scalp that actually have the potential to treat whatever problems your hair/scalp is exhibiting. Each wash, rinse, scrub, or soak should be a response to the ‘symptoms’ of your hair for that day and treatment for how you hope your hair will look tomorrow. For every ingredient or mixture and every interesting recipe they find online, ask yourself, “Will/Could this help my scalp naturally balance itself and make my hair look great?”

Conditioning, acidic ingredients are apple cider vinegar, white vinegar, lemon/lime/orange/apple/grapefruit juice and juice from other sour fruits, strong tea, amla berry paste, alpha-hydroxy rich fruits like tomato juice and applesauce, shikakai, beer, egg yolks, the juice of green vegetables, etc.
Apple cider vinegar is probably the first acid new no poo-ers try. Some people love what apple cider vinegar does to their hair so much that they would marry it if they could, while others run screaming from apple cider vinegar after a single use and still have nightmares about the mess it made of their hair. Others love apple cider vinegar, but can’t stand the smell. Apple cider vinegar is said to naturally have some oils in it, so might not be a good choice for those with naturally oily scalp. Heinz is an ACV brand to avoid. What I'm trying to say is, don't be afraid to experiment. If apple cider vinegar leaves your hair feeling grimy, try white vinegar, or lemon juice.

Basic (alkaline) ingredients are baking soda, honey, clay, yucca root paste, castile soap, Dr. Bronner's, corn starch, egg whites, tonic water, water with dissolved TUMs tablets, etc.


Acids can be put on the scalp and hair length, though people with fine/thin hair often say that acid on the roots of their hair makes it look greasy. Basic mixtures go on the scalp and never ever on the hair length.
Acids washes are usually diluted anywhere from 1:16 to 1:2 (1 tbsp vinegar & 1 cup water to 1/2 cup vinegar & 1 cup water) but are occasionally as strong as 1:1 (1 cup of each). Basic washes (when they involve baking soda) are usually not stronger than 1:16 and can be as diluted as 1:96 (1/2 teaspoon baking soda & 1 cup water). A good place to start your acid and basic experimenting is the standard 1:16. Decrease, or increase, your proportion of baking soda and vinegar from there until you find the minimum amount that gives you the desired results.

Base before acid. Always. Always. Always! Or acid after base. Whichever is easier for you to remember.

I really loved cactus_rs's advice: "Scrub harder and rinse longer. The reason shampoos and soaps are effective is because they make it easier for water to cut through dirt and rinse it away. That's what the lather is doing: water's job, just much more effectively. When you take out the foaming agents and lather, that means you have to work a bit harder at getting stuff out. "

Water-only washes are scrubbing your scalp with the pads of your fingers under scalding hot water to open and clean your pores and mechanically remove oil/grease and waxy sebum, then rinsing in frigid water to close your pores.

Conditioner only wash is where you wash your hair only with a conditioner (which can be all natural/eco-friendly, homemade, or regular store bought) because, believe it or not, most conditioners contain enough cleaning agents to do shampoo’s job. If you want to try this method, which is especially popular among the curly-haired girls, check the Ingredients section on bottles to be sure they don’t have parabens (a chemical preservative), silicone, or any Sodium Lauryl/Laureth Sulfate (harsh detergents which often causes skin irritation, responsible for the foaming suds found in most cleaners).
http://www.wikihow.com/Plop-Your-Hair

There are egg washes (usually egg yolk but sometimes whole egg) and beer washes. Some people swear that boar bristle brushes or wooden/horn combs will solve all your oil and wax/sebum problems by distributing oil from the scalp down the length of your hair. Raw, unpasteurized honey is a great moisturizing cleanser, while applesauce is a mild degreaser that doesn't strip your hair of its natural oils. Aloe vera is said to cure anything from itchy, flaky, dry, or frizzy hair/scalp.

Acidic egg yolks, which add moisture to hair, and basic egg whites, which gently remove excess oils, both leave hair shiny and the boost of protein gives it strength. Too much protein, or egg washing too often, can leave hair frizzy, stiff, and easily broken. Always rinse the egg out with cold water unless you want scrambled eggs in your hair.

Baking soda is a harsh and abrasive (think sandpaper) cleanser. It does make hair softer but that is because the baking soda is actually slowly destroying your hair’s keratin. The softness is a symptom of your hair disintegrating and falling apart. This damaging side effect is why you want to use the minimum amount of baking soda needed to get a slippery feeling on your hands and scalp. If you have distilled, bottled, rain, or boiled water, the basic mixture is a great place to use it. It is possible that adding between 1/8 to 1 teaspoon of salt per cup of water will help increase the effectiveness of the baking soda, making it possible to use less. Another baking soda minimizing technique is to apply your mixture to a dry scalp, because putting your mixture on a wet scalp means the water already on/in your hair will combine with the water mixture containing your baking soda to dilute it even more, which forces you to use more baking soda. Unless you truly have something nasty stuck in the lengths of your hair, apply baking soda only to your scalp, not your hair length.
http://empoweredsustenance.com/no-poo-method-damages-hair/

If your hair is a bit oily, but you want to delay washing, then use corn starch to soak up extra oil. Put a couple pinches on the palm and fingers of one hand, rub hands together until the white is distributed everywhere so that only an iridescent sheen remains on your hands, (perhaps clap your hands if too much corn starch was dusted on and you now have clump left on your hand), then rub the hands onto greasy areas of hair. Use a brush or comb to further spread the starch through your hair. If, when you are done, your hair is ashy or pale, wipe a dry terry cloth across the affected area until you are satisfied.
Nothing involved in this cornstarch process should be wet: hands, hair, brush, towel, the cornstarch itself. ALL dry. Don’t apply the cornstarch while wearing the outfit you plan to wear for the rest of that day; not because this technique is super messy. Never apply cornstarch directly to your scalp or it will appear that you suffer from the world’s worst case of dandruff. Some people recommend brushing the cornstarch through your hair while upside down by lying on a bed with your hair hanging off the side. (This technique requires you to afterwards brush your hair again while right-side up.)
For those of us with dark hair, mixing cornstarch with some cocoa powder, cinnamon, mineral makeup, colored sidewalk chalk, or oatmeal pulverized to powder in a clean coffee grinder makes cornstarch less obvious.


For VOLUME try
A rinse with flat beer.
Gently rubbing coconut oil through your hair and scalp the night before a morning shower.
Brushing cornstarch into your hair.
Using less honey, IF you have fine hair, since it can weight down the thin strands.

For DANDRUFF try
Washing in the order of acid, basic, acid. The first acid rinse on your scalp, with white vinegar being specifically recommended, loosens future dandruff so that your ordinary basic scrub removes more. The final acid wash, made up of whatever you ordinarily use, simply returns your ph back to normal.
Using henna.
Using more moisture-friendly ingredients, like aloe juice.
Applying diluted tea tree oil.
Using more acid and/or less baking soda.
Staying hydrated by drinking more water.
Putting cinnamon in your acid rinse. It can be ground cinnamon, a stick, or tea. The recipe for ground cinnamon is 1/2 teaspoon in 20 oz of acid rinse. Too much cinnamon can cause skin reactions, so experiment carefully and never before an important event.
Avoiding clay as a basic washes.

For DRY ENDS try
Dipping the ends in coconut oil a few hours before or the night before your morning shower.
Dipping the ends in argan oil a few hours before or the night before your morning shower.
Dipping the ends in jojoba oil -- which might be significantly more effective than coconut oil, so be careful -- a few hours before or the night before your morning shower.
Dipping the ends in (extra virgin) olive oil a few hours before or the night before your morning shower.

For SPLIT ENDS of hair try
Cutting current split ends off. Sorry, only glue will put the splits back together. (*Don’t glue your hair.) Until cut, they will only increase in size.
Dipping the ends in coconut oil a few hours before or the night before your morning shower.
Dipping the ends in jojoba oil to reduce likelihood of future split ends a few hours before or the night before your morning shower. (Jojoba oil might be significantly more effective than coconut oil, so be careful.)

For STATIC hair try
Using more moisturizers.
Using less coconut oil.
Using more mild cleaners, like applesauce or egg, so that your hair retains its natural oils.
Using combs made of wood or horn to distribute the oils in your scalp along the length of your hair.
Using a boar bristle brush to distribute the oils in your scalp along the length of your hair.
Using baking soda less often.
Using baking soda in a more dilute mixture.
Getting a haircut to remove split ends.
Use drying and damaging heating elements like blow dryers, flat irons, and curling irons less often.

For SHINE try
Using more concentrated acid.
Switching acids.
Leaving in your acid rinse, perhaps leave in a diluted version after rinsing out your regular acid rinse.
A rinse with flat beer.

For SOFT/STIFF hair try
A rinse with flat beer.
Gently rubbing coconut oil through your hair and scalp the night before a morning shower.
Using protein-rich washes less often.
Adding moisture to your hair.

For BREAKING hair try
Using protein-rich washes less often; twice a month, or once every two weeks.
Infusing strength into your hair with a protein-filled egg wash.
Making sure that you rinse thoroughly between your basic and acid washes.
Using baking soda less often.
Using baking soda in a more dilute mixture.
Adding moisture to your hair.

For STRINGY hair try
Using less conditioning ingredients.
Using less moisturizing ingredients.

For ITCHY hair try
Adding moisture to your scalp.
Increasing the acidity of your scalp.
Using baking soda less often.
Using baking soda or other basics in a more dilute mixture.
Making sure that you rinse thoroughly between your basic and acid washes.
Adding around 1 teaspoon of salt to your baking soda mixture to increase its effectiveness.
Changing from baking soda to another basic.
Using aloe juice to soothe and moisturize your skin.

For RED SCALP try
Changing from baking soda to another basic because some people are sensitive to baking soda.
Using baking soda less often because baking soda is very abrasive.
Using baking soda or other basics in a more dilute mixture.
Using aloe juice to soothe your skin.

For FRIZZY hair try
Using aloe juice.
Using protein-rich washes less often.
Changing acids.
Rinsing your acid off sooner.
Using a heavier cleaner like honey.

For WAXY hair try
Increasing the acidity of your scalp by applying more concentrated acid.
Increasing the acidity of your scalp by applying your regular acid mixture more often.
Changing acids.
Using combs made of wood or horn to distribute the oils in your scalp along the length of your hair.
Using a boar bristle brush to distribute the oils in your scalp along the length of your hair.
Using water only washes, properly performed, more often.
Leaving in your acid rinse, perhaps leave in a diluted version after rinsing out your regular acid rinse.
Rinsing your acid off your scalp after a longer soak.
Rinsing your acid off your scalp after a harder scrub.
Using water that is not hard in your basic and acid mixtures: distilled, filtered, bottled, rain, or salt water.
Installing a carbon, chlorine, or other kind of filter on your shower head to lessen the effects of hard water.
Washing after heavy/sweaty exercise.

For GREASY/OILY hair try
Changing acids.
Using combs made of wood or horn to distribute the oils at your roots along the length of your hair.
Using a boar bristle brush to distribute the oils at your roots along the length of your hair.
Using water only washes, properly performed, more often.
Keeping acid off your scalp as much as possible, IF you have thin/fine hair.
Using gentler cleansers that don’t strip the scalp of natural oils, reducing your scalp’s need to produce oil.
Washing after heavy/sweaty exercise.

For EASY TO UN/TANGLE hair try
Changing acids.
Using combs made of wood or horn to distribute the oils in your scalp along the length of your hair.
Using a boar bristle brush to distribute the oils in your scalp along the length of your hair.
Using gentler cleansers that don’t strip the scalp of natural oils.
Rinsing acid off your scalp after a longer soak.
Leaving in your acid rinse, perhaps leave in a diluted version after rinsing out your regular acid rinse.
Spraying an acid mixture in a spray bottle onto your hair.
Applying a paste of fenugreek seed powder on your hair and rinsing after 5 minutes.


Whether your scalp is oily/greasy, waxy with nasty grey/yellow sebum that leaves gunk on your brush, has static, is limp, fluffy, dull, frizzy, brittle, breaking too easily, dry, dandruff, itchy, has split ends, the tags on http://no-poo.livejournal.com/ can help you learn more about your hair type and how to make it look wonderful cheaply, naturally, and hopefully, easily.



All units are metric and liquid. Conversions according to http://www.onlineconversion.com/cooking.htm
cup
1 cup = 16 2/3 tablespoons (tbsp)
1 cup = 50 teaspoons (tsp)
1 cup = 8.45 US ounces (oz)
1 cup = 8.8 UK ounces (oz)
1 cup = 4869.22 drops
1 cup = 250 milliliters (ml)

US ounce (oz)
1 oz = 1/8 cup (0.1183)
1 oz = 1.97 tbsp
1 oz = 5.9 tsp
1 oz = 576 drops
1 oz = 29.57 ml

UK ounce (oz)
1 oz = 1/9 cup (0.1136)
1 oz = 1.9 tbsp
1 oz = 5.68 tsp
1 oz = 553.4 drops
1 oz = 28.41 ml

tablespoon (tbsp)
1 tbsp = 1/16 cup (0.06)
1 tbsp = 3 tsp
1 tbsp = 0.51 US oz
1 tbsp = 0.53 UK oz
1 tbsp = 292.15 drops
1 tbsp = 15 ml

teaspoon (tsp)
1 tsp = 1/50 cup (0.02)
1 tsp = 1/3 tbsp
1 tsp = 0.169 US oz
1 tsp = 0.176 UK oz
1 tsp = 97.4 drops
1 tsp = 5 ml


Fractions and their decimal conversions
1/16 = 0.0625
1/9 = 0.111
1/8 = 0.125 ___ 2/16
1/4 = 0.25 ____ 2/8 , 4/16 ,
1/3 = 0.333 ___ 3/9
3/8 = 0.375
1/2 = 0.5 _____ 8/16 , 4/8 , 2/4
5/8 = 0.625
2/3 =0.6666 ___ 6/9
3/4 = 0.75 ____ 12/16 , 6/8 ,
7/8 = 0.875



Next edition:
How to apply regular and essential oils
How to treat dry ends
What is and how to fight Hard Water
Value of henna use for no poo-ers
When to use Glycerine
Tips for shortening the transition period
Why 15 minutes soaks are so important

Using a harsh facial cleanser to fight my oily face and acne
gatorgirl7563
after 24 years of using store-bought shampoo and conditioner
COLOR: medium brown
TEXTURE: extremely fine
LENGTH: very long, nearly to my belt
THICKNESS: extremely thin
MOISTURE: a crisco factory when the boss is watching because a deadline is approaching and his job is on the line (aka super greasy)
POROSITY: extremely low (Still floating after twelve hours.)
SHAPE: very straight and very limp - no height, no volume, no fluff, etc
WATER QUALITY: soft, filtered
I currently have peppermint, rosemary, lavender, and cinnamon ESO, as well as castor oil, vitamin E oil, and fractionated coconut oil.


I've been considering whether I should stop using my current commercial facial cleanser. My face is at least as oily as my hair, maybe more. I have really bad acne and use a cleanser that has the maximum amount of acne medicine legally allowed in a non-prescription cleanser. Unfortunately a known side effect is that it really dries out your skin. I've done so much thinking about how harsh shampoo strips my scalp of its natural oils, which makes it overproduce to compensate, that I began wondering about my face and how the same thing is happening there, too.
But I don't want to quit cold turkey, either. I've gone months using only gentle, moisturizer-infused baby wipes on my face and did not like the results.

Will the good ph and natural balance things happening on my scalp transfer goodness to my face or might the drying chemicals on my face prevent goodness from happening on my scalp -- like it's all one thing and the same treatment must be done to both parts to see results?

Are there any good moisturizing essential oils that I can put on my dry skin while still using my commercial cleanser -- to moisturize to so it doesn't overproduce and balance ph? Are there any acne-fighting essential oils (or acne fighting something else) that might ease my transition or help me get the courage to quit my cleanser? Do I even need to stop using it?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
October 18, 2014
I have been using OCM for about a week now and I needed to share with everyone here how happy my face is with it. I'm still using my "maximum amount of acne medicine legally allowed in a non-prescription cleanser" face cleaner -- but much less -- and afterward I do OCM and I can already tell a difference in the level of oil production on my face and the faster speed at which acne disappears.

Before, if I didn't wash my face in the morning, by lunchtime, I could feel that all the oil on my forehead had slid down onto my upper eyelids. After a couple hours of that, it would slide into my eyes and that BURNED! Now I feel like I could get away with not washing in the morning, though I haven't actually tested it.

My recipe is (tesp = teaspoon)
6 tesp of castor oil
2 tesp of olive oil (not extra virgin, after looking up the difference. I also found a reputable article online claiming that the majority of imported EVOO doesn't actually meet EVOO standards, so why not use regular?)
5 drops of tea tree oil
6 drops of jojoba oil

I decided against using grape seed oil, because the oil lacks all the good qualities of grape seeds and is created in a way that uses a lot of chemicals, and chose Vitamin E oil to replace it. Then I rejected VEO, too, because research told me VEO is heavy with big molecules, which attracts dirt/dust which blocks pores and causes acne prone people to break out even more. VEO benefits also seemed to be easily stopped, or even reversed, by sunlight exposure.
http://authoritynutrition.com/grape-seed-oil/
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/21/vitamin-e-oil-tips_n_3477654.html
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/skin/vitaminE/

EVOO
http://www.oliveoiltimes.com/olive-oil-basics/report-most-imported-extra-virgin-olive-oils-arent/4316
http://www.oliveoiltimes.com/extra-virgin-olive-oil

Flaxseed or linseed oil is an oil that passes my research tests, but I never got around to actually buying any.
http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-flaxseed-oil.html
http://www.livestrong.com/article/180899-the-benefits-of-topically-applying-flaxseed-oil-to-skin/

My understanding so far
gatorgirl7563
I'm new at this, but I've been reading, researching, and collecting data like crazy. I want to know if my understanding (gained mostly from reading the advice and opinions of the people here) is right. It's kind of in expository essay form, sorry. I've been writing too many school papers lately and can't help it.



BS baking soda
ACV apple cider vinegar
WV white vinegar
WO water only wash
BBB boar bristle brush
TTO tea tree oil
CO conditioner only
OCM ?
GSE ?


People go no-poo for many different reasons - to save money, protect the environment, keep strange and unnatural chemicals off themselves, traditional hair care isn't working for them - but the goal is always the same - a healthy, natural, great-looking hair and scalp.

The natural ph of your hair is 4. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PH) Substances with a ph less than 7 are said to be acidic and substances/mixtures with a ph greater than 7 are basic or alkaline. Pure water's ph is 7 and hard water's ph can be as high as 9, which means that even pure water is basic compared to your hair. As a no poo-er, you want to keep your scalp's ph as close to 4 as possible, while at the same time it stays moisturized, shiny, strong, easy-to-untangle, supple, good volume, etc. It's a balancing act.

Each ingredient you use to accomplish this balancing act does at least one thing you like and often has at least one effect on your hair you don't like. Oh, the ingredients can interact with each other.

Basic (aka alkaline) ingredients and mixtures are your cleansing shampoo, while acidic mixtures are your conditioner, bringing your hair back up to it's normal acidity, making it shiny and untangle easily.

But what about frizzy-ness, dandruff, fluffy/limp, extra greasy or dry hair?

Well, that's when your other ingredients and how your basic ingredients and acidic ingredients interact matter.
Tea tree oil, jojoba oil, coconut oil, coconut milk, castor oil, grapeseed oil, safflower oil, olive oil, vitamin e oil, avocado, shea, aloe, essential oils like rosemary, orange, nettle, lemongrass, peppermint, spearmint, cinnamon, or soaking your rinse in the actual herbs and then filtering them out before use. There's castile soap, homemade soaps, Dr. Bronner's soaps and shampoos, silicone- and paraben-free shampoos and conditioners.

And, of course, your hair is unique: its natural color, texture, length, thickness, moisture level, shape, and porosity will determine how it looks and feels in reaction to the ingredients you put on your head. Your quality of water (hard water, soft, filtered, salt water) also have a big effect on how your hair reacts to the ingredients. (i.e. Dr. Bronner's and hard water do not mix!)

Acidic ingredients are white vinegar, apple cider vinegar, lemon/lime/orange juice, strong tea, tomato sauce, applesauce, beer, etc. Some people love what ACV does to their hair so much that they would marry it if they could, while others run screaming from ACV after a single use and still have nightmares about it. What I'm trying to say is, don't be afraid to experiment. If ACV leaves your hair feeling grimy, try WV or lemon juice.

Basic (alkaline) ingredients are baking soda, honey, clay, corn starch, egg whites, etc.

Acids should be put on the hair length, and mostly not the scalp (there's some debate over this). Bases go on the scalp and never ever on the hair length (it does make the hair softer but that is because it is actually slowly destroying it; at least that is what baking soda does. softer = falling apart).
http://empoweredsustenance.com/no-poo-method-damages-hair/

Vinegar acids washes are usually diluted anywhere from 1:16 to 1:2 (1 tbsp vinegar & 1 cup water to 1/2 cup vinegar & 1 cup water) but are occasionally as strong as 1:1 (1 cup of each). Basic washes (when they involve baking soda) are usually not stronger than 1:8 (1 tbsp bs & 1/2 cup water) and can be as diluted as 1:96 (1/2 tesp bs & 1 cup water). A good place to start experimenting is the standard 1:16. Decrease, or increase, your proportion of baking soda and vinegar from there until you find the minimum amount that gives you the desired results.

Base before acid. Always. Always. Always! Or acid after base. Whichever is easier for you to remember.

Water-only washes are scrubbing your scalp with the pads of your fingers under scalding hot water to open and clean your pores, then rinse in frigid water to close your pores.

Conditioner Only wash is where you wash your hair only with a conditioner (which can be all natural/eco-friendly, homemade, or regular store bought.)

There are egg washes (usually egg yolk but sometimes whole egg) and beer washes. Some people swear that BBBs or wooden combs will solve all your oil and wax/sebum problems. Honey is a great moisturizing cleanser while applesauce is a mild degreaser that doesn't strip your hair of its natural oils. Aloe vera is said to cure anything from itchy, flaky, dry, or frizzy hair/scalp.

I really loved cactus_rs's advice: "Scrub harder and rinse longer. The reason shampoos and soaps are effective is because they make it easier for water to cut through dirt and rinse it away. That's what the lather is doing: water's job, just much more effectively. When you take out the foaming agents and lather, that means you have to work a bit harder at getting stuff out. "

Whether your scalp is oily/greasy, waxy with nasty grey/yellow sebum that leaves gunk on your brush, has static, is limp, fluffy, dull, frizzy, brittle, breaking too easily, dry, dandruff, itchy, has split ends, the tags on http://no-poo.livejournal.com/ can help you learn more about your hair type and how to make it look wonderful cheaply, naturally, and hopefully, easily.



I have more but it's not in essay form (still copied and pasted snippets from internet or an incomplete thought format).

If you know of another basic to add or an abbreviated acronym, feel free to tell me. Do you agree or disagree with anything?

How to use oil and how to get it off when you used too much
gatorgirl7563
I have super-low porosity hair and last night I put the 1/4 teaspoon of castor oil in my 1/2 cup of 1:2 acv-water mixture, shook, and then put on my hair, and left in. It was too much and now my hair is a total greaseball. It's oily and I brush and brush but it doesn't really untangle. HOW DO I GET IT OUT?!

Am I supposed to do something to make that oil not float on top of my mixtures in the future? Do essential oils float, too?

If I want to leave a diluted avc-water mix in my hair at the end of my routine, then how many drops (of castor oil or anything else) should I put into the next 1/2 cup acid rinse I leave in?

after 24 years of using store-bought shampoo and conditioner
COLOR: medium brown
TEXTURE: extremely fine
LENGTH: very long, nearly to my belt
THICKNESS: extremely thin
MOISTURE: a crisco factory when the boss is watching because a deadline is approaching and his job is on the line (aka super greasy)
POROSITY: extremely low (Still floating after twelve hours.)
SHAPE: very straight and very limp - no height, no volume, no fluff etc
HEALTH: fine
WATER QUALITY: soft, filtered

I have peppermint, rosemary, lavender, and cinnamon ESO, as well as castor oil, vitamin E oil, tea tree oil, jojoba oil, and fractionated coconut oil.
Is any of that an oil that definitely shouldn't be combined with vinegar and/or left in my hair?
Is any of that an oil that I would be better off mixing with my raw honey/canned coconut milk/castile liquid soap mixture instead? Or mixed with my baking soda/water mixture?
Is any of that an oil that should only be put on my hair tips? Or combed into my hair?
Or anything else, like my greasy, fine, long hair type?

New to no poo, question on alternative ways to wash besides BS or Dr. B
kkelli0225
I started no poo on Saturday (prior to that, I was washing every other, or every third day with a no-sulfate shampoo) On Saturday night, I washed with diluted Dr. Bronners (8:1) and rinsed with ACV. While damp, I put in a little coconut oil. On Sunday morning, it was looking very dry, so I put in some Argan oil, which made my hair very greasy. (now I know I have low porosity hair, a strand sat on top of the water for over 12 hours!). On Sunday night, I washed with an egg and then rinsed with ACV. On Monday, I brushed thoroughly in sections with my BBB (greasy on scalp, dry on ends). Today (Tuesday) it is looking greasy, but the ends are still dry. I plan to brush again tonight, and wash on Wedn night (I have a meeting on Thursday, and I can’t look like a grease ball). I was going to make aloe honey shampoo. My plan is to put most of the shampoo (reserving some) on the ends and length of my hair and let it sit on my hair for a few minutes while I am in the steamy shower. Then I am going to take the reserved amount and add a little of the diluted Dr. B. and scrub that on my scalp to get rid of the greasiness.

So I have a couple of questions, will adding the Dr. B to my scalp cancel any of the moisture effects of the aloe/honey shampoo?

I would like to get to where I am using alternatives to Dr. B (most of the time) to removing the grease, maybe adding a drop of castor oil to the DIY shampoo instead? Applesauce? Lemon juice?

What else removes the grease? I am not sure if my hair really liked the egg wash, so I would not want to do that regularly.

Is it bad to change my washing ingredients so often? (honey / aloe one wash, applesauce the next)
Thanks!

No poo help?
alphieboo
Hi, I've been no poo for about 2 weeks now, and I really struggled not to give up today.

Basically, I've been using baking soda and apple cider vinegar to wash my hair and I got that horrible waxy feeling, my hair felt like waxy straw, my hands felt like they were covered in gunk when I touched my hair, and it just felt a bit like one massive clump of hair.

After doing some research, I saw that washing their hair with eggs helped some people, so that's what I did today, rather than give up. I was a bit silly though - so after washing it with two whole eggs, despite it feeling great, I still went ahead and used a little bit of baking soda at the roots of my hair because my hair didn't feel clean. I did a acv rinse as normal.

So, it's drying at the moment, and the bits that i didnt use baking soda on are not waxy at all, so thank goodness that's been fixed. They're also shiny, although a sort of dry looking and feeling, and slightly brittle feeling. The baking soda top layer of hair feels waxy - so at least I know its the baking soda and my hard water not agreeing that's causing it!

However, I used to have silky, straight, shiny hair (that I definitely should have appreciated more at the time!), and my hair when i was using shampoo, since I hit the age of about 14 (I'm 19 now), was dry, frizzy,wavy, soft but sort of fluffy feeling? I can deal with hormones or whatever having made my hair wavier but I desperately long for those silky locks! Even now, after the egg wash, I feel like its sort of fluffy.

My problem with using eggs is that -
1. I cannot stand the smell, although having said that, if it gave me shiny silky hair, I dont care. But has anyone got any ideas as to what could help?
2. It's not giving me shiny silky hair - is that just me being impatient? Should I just give it more time? Has anyone got any alternatives?
3. I dont know if this is just because I was being rough, but I still seem to lose a lot of hair when i brush it, although conisderably less than when i used the baking soda. Anyone using eggs have this problem?
4. Eggs are so expensive. Is there anything like eggs, which seem to just be so so so gentle on my hair but cheaper?

I was going to ask should I give baking soda another go, with distilled water, but even by writing all of this out I seem to have answered my own question and decided that I'm not it's biggest fan. It's so strange because I seem to be loving eggs, but hating them at the same time - I think it's because I'm so happy that it feels clean and not clumpy and waxy, as if I have washed it with shampoo, but now i'm thinking right ok and trying to find the right shampoo that will make my hair perfect. If that makes any sense whatsoever. Haha.

Sorry about the absolute essay!! I just want to find something that will make my hair healthy and strong and shiny. (And not fluffy. I hate that so much) Thanks!

Oil Covered Hay
Purple Flowers
onlyangil
I have tried a bunch of things on my hair, and have no idea where to go from here...

I have been no poo for about 7 years.

I think I have hard water, and I swim in a non-chlorine salt water pool a few times a week now it is summer (but this has been this way for a while). I use a wood pin brush, and a boars hair brush on my hair daily. I use ACV and sesame, not together, oil 2 or 3 times a week on the tips of my wet hair about 4 inches up. I wash with honey weekly, with egg white each BS once a month. (So, W1 honey and BS, W2 honey, W3 honey and egg white, W4 honey.) When I use the yoke it makes my hair very stiff and brittle. I tried beer on my hair to set pin curls and it make my hair a tinny bit softer, but mostly just frizzy and stiff. These events leave me worried about protein, therefore I avoid coconut oil and avocado.

I have lightened my hair at a salon some 9+m.s ago (and to tell the truth it is after the tec "forgot" and washed my hair that trouble really started). It was a level 10 in the front and a level 9 in the back which I hennaed and wonderful light red. Recently lightened the over grown roots from a level 2 to an 8 with peroxide, v30, and BS and dyed with Ion Violet, and as it faded redyed Gentian Violet. I also have done a a vit. c treatment on my hair to try and pull the color out, as the purples on the yellow blond made brown. Ick. I am planing on doing another vit. c treatment, possible a vodka treatment (and if needed a prox, v20ish and bs) to see if I can pull the GV out any more before dye it again.

I do not feel that I have ruined my hair, even if these are all drying/damaging events. I have very few split ends, and my hair is strong enough to tie in a knot! However it will tangle like a MoFo unless braid or curl it before bed, and untangle it by hand before I brush it at night. They only times it has really felt soft recently was a few months ago I was at a hotel and showed WO. Each time I change what I do with my hair it feel a little better then goes back to oil covered hay.

I am so lost! I really want to cry!!
Ideas?

P.S. If you have any ideas about getting the brown to a dyeable level let me know that too... lol.

RANDOM MORNING UPDATE:
My hair to day seems softer, and ever so slightly less oily - in parts, the thinner parts. My bathroom is being remodeled and the pool had a leak, so it has been a few days nice I got my hair Nice and Wet/Washed. Is this just really build up from hard water? It isn't "waxy". I feel like it aught to be something more.

Send Help!
ellieallie
I don't know where I went wrong, but I really want to go right before my birthday in less than two weeks.

My hair started misbehaving this winter and being unmanageable. I decided to try co-only first. That was in March. I decided the Shea butter brand was right for me and bought the formula for dry hair.

This went well for about a month. I typically shower every other day; I use only water on my hair every other shower, so I wash my hair about every four days.

Well, it was April, and my hair was greasy. I live in the South, so it was already humid. I switched to the volumizing conditioner, and this worked well for another month.

Then, my hair seemed to get used to it. My friend uses baking soda; we don't have the same kind of hair, but I tried it anyway. It went well for a week or so, but then I noticed my hair was staticy as ****. I tried putting my conditioner on the ends, but it didn't help.

She had told me she didn't use acv. She just puts two tbs of baking soda into a mason jar with water. I did the same, but I always eyeball the amount I use. I tried cutting back to one tbs. Then I tried a mason jar of acv and water in conjunction with half a jar of water and bs.

It took the static out, but now my hair is limp and ugly. The roots are greasy. First, they were crunchy from bs, so I poured some acv on them. I saw a recent post about how going back and forth with bs (or something similar) and acv will slowly strip your hair.

I just want to find what's right for me before my birthday. I'm not opposed to buying organic shampoos and conditioners. I never used them before my hair went crazy. I just don't know what happened this winter to make my hair so upset and why it hasn't gone back to normal yet.

The worst part is my birthday is coming up. The last thing I want to worry about is having awful hair! Especially since I'm going to be dyeing it for the first time ever. I've always wanted pink hair. I'm going to have it professionally done. That being said, any recs on what to tell the stylist to shampoo my hair with?

I'm posting pictures of how my hair was in fall 2012, back when I still liked it a lot. I also have a couple of how it was this spring when whatever I was using at the time was working. Basically pictures of how my hair SHOULD look. Then, I'll post ones of how it looks at this very moment. I showered last night. My hair is fine. It gets greasy at the roots and static and limp from my ears down.

Pictures...Collapse )

Please, help. ;w; I don't know what to do anymore. I don't know what to try. I just want my hair back the way it was. Also, if anyone can suggest how to tag this, I'll add them.

Dandruff with WO, no-poo for 2 years
diamonddust3
Hi everyone, I have been no poo for two years. It is the best thing I have every done for my hair and it has made my life so much easier. I have very short, thick, straight hair that hasn't been dyed in years. Almost a year ago I started travelling and went WO. I rinse my hair in the shower with diluted ACV or WV (1 tablespoon to 1/2 cup of cold water) and then massage my scalp when I'm done the shower with a dry towel. I was only once every week or two when it starts to look greasy.
Ever since I started no poo I seem to have at least a little bit of dandruff. The past few months the dandruff seems to be quite noticeable. I make sure that I never scratch my scalp with my comb to aggravate the dandruff.
Any thoughts on what might be causing dandruff, and/or suggestions on possible solutions? I should note that I am travelling and unfortunately I have limited access to shampoo/ conditioner ingredients, and it is difficult to get a regular schedule in terms of my water supply and my diet.
Thanks so much!

Return to No Poo after about a year lapse
Evil Grin
anjel_kitty
Hi community. I wanted to report that I have returned to my regimen of shampoo free, and have been no poo once more for about 4 weeks after a year hiatus. I had stopped using ACV/BS because my husband hated the smell of vinegar and for a while I was unable to really experiment much with trying to make the whole process more pleasant for those who didn't like the vinegar. I went back to using shampoo and conditioner, and found that in the extreme dryness my hair got a lot more damaged. Back earlier in May I decided to finally go back to using the no poo system. Its taken a while, and my hair has to rebound from about a year of shampoo build up, but thus far I've started noticing that my natural wave comes out in my hair after the vinegar wash. I have my BS in a canister and do the paste in my hand and thoroughly scrub my scalp. Then I wash with ACV that I've distilled through rosemary and have cut the concentration considerably to about 1/5 parts ACV and water. I find that this helps the ACV a lot less strong and smell a lot better.
Here is my current set up for my ACV and my BS:

I used one of my cat's old litter containers to store the diluted ACV.
My only frustration at this point is that my hair is still really frizzy especially at the top of my head. If I add the least bit of oil (tea tree and coconut) it get's really really oily and gross looking. So I'm wondering if anyone has any tips to help out with this issue.

NO POO --HELP WITH WAXY HAIR
droberie
I am brand new to the no poo method and have tried to research as much as possible before starting it. I am not huge into all organic honestly, but am looking for something to improve my hair health. I have very fine/thin/wavy/curly hair....I have always blow dried and worn it straight. It's not a very flattering curl when I air dry it, bc I have no clue how to manage it.

Ok, my issue....I have only been using no poo for about 2 weeks (I know I probably need to give it a little longer but I feel like I may need some adjustments and don't know what to do.) I also use African Black soap occasionally (as suggested by someone who uses this as shampoo)

Issues:
--Even while in the shower after using the BS/ACV mix my hair feels SUPER heavy and when I either let it air dry or blow dry it it is super WAXY at the roots. I can barely brush through it.
--I'm noticing the dry itchy scalp starting to dandruff
--Hair loss= major! I have always had issues with this but it's gotten much worse.

Here is the run down of what I have been trying:
Day1: clarifying shampoo with Shear Moisture conditioner (no rinse and only on ends). Air dried. Hair soft, curly and no frizz---although I just look weird with curly hair
Day 2: No Wash. Still curly, no frizz, a little oily, but ok
Day 3: BS & ACV with a little Shear moisture cond on ends. Blow dried. Big mistake with extra cond...super oily..used salt water mix spray to absorb oil. Air dried.....NAPPY looking
Day 4: No wash....used salt water mix again and air dried. Yuck
Day 5: Af. Black soap shampoo and ACV. Heavy hair, blow dried. Super oily and waxy.
Day 6: Water only. Air dried. No tangles....no frizz...curly....didn't look oily but super waxy feeling and heavy.
Day 7: No wash in the AM. Oily. BS & ACV in evening. Blow dried. Very oily and waxy again.
Day 8: Only water. Air dried. Nasty
Day 9: Only water. Air dried. Nasty
Day 10: BS & ACV. Air dried. Heavy and waxy.
Day 11: af blck soap with Shear moisture on ends. blow dried. Waxy...curled end with flat iron...looks ok, feels gross.
Day 12: Water only. waxy.
Day 13: Af. Blck. soap with Shear moisture. Air dry. Waxy!
Day 14: No wash. Still waxy. PM: BS & ACV, air dried over night. So far....hair loss= major!
Day 15: No wash. Waxy...brushed with comb and straighted. Wore in ponytail but feels disgusting and heavy.
Day 16: No wash. Still waxy.
Day 17: No wash. waxy and oily, itchy and seeing lots of dandruff. Still major hair loss.
Day 18: (today) about to give up and use traditional shampoo. =-(

Sorry if that is a lot to read through, but I don't know what to do to remedy this. =-(

Need advice, no poo since five months
lilly_lee
Hello,

I'm in need for some advice! I've been doing no poo for five months but I still feel the need to wash my hair every second day. I started with BS and ACV or conditioner only every other day. But lately I've experimented with egg wash, rhasoul clay, birch leaves and rye flour. I absolutely love clay and rye flour and my hair gets really soft and fluffy the first day. I usually rinse with either ACV or lemon juice and water. But the second day it feels and looks oily and greasy. It doesn't get better and I really thought it would after five months. I'm Swedish and I have typically Scandinavian hair, blond and thin hairs. The colour is nice and shiny the first day, but gets dark and dull the second day already. It will take a lot for me to start using shampoo again but I was looking forward to not feeling the need to wash my hair every day...

Does anyone have some advice??

Coconut oil helped with build-up/residue on the brush
liza_di_grazia
  I've been washing with natural products for ver two years so far -- clay hairwashes most of the time. The promblem I have always had with my no poo was residue on the brush -- dark oily, greyish oily -- even after the wash.
  And now, on 'the water only' route -- I have been washing my hair (big wash) once a week -- it was hard: most of the week the hair was oily. Water only in between the 'big' washes didn't help, neither did fruit juice or vegetable juice masks -- this only helped until the end of the day.
  The results are healthier hair, less hair loss, fewer split ends.
  The longest I could go without touching hair with water was 4 days (it was after 6 weeks, I think) -- hair was volumous, good-looking. Then -- 2 days on the 3d you'd better do sth to look nice.
  Perhaps some things depend on the season. Now summer warmth is coming.
  As for the residue on the brush -- I wanted to share this joy -- maybe someone else needs this. On the 27th of April I put old refined cocnut oil on my slightly wetted hair and kept it on for 1,5 hours -- then washed it with black clay with a bit of tea tre essential oil. And there was no residue/gunk on the brush for 2 days! Hurray!
  My hair is long, thick, and strong, brown.
  Now I've decided to wash my hair on the 4th or 5th day (then, when/if possibly -- I'll add a day longer etc.) -- trying to stick to this, I'll continue with my haircare experiments.

Transition -- tangible results after 6 weeks (for normal hair)
liza_di_grazia
  Hello, no-poers! How after 6 weeks of water-washing and training hair I'm starting to see and feel more noticeable results. I have been giving my hair a 'big' wash once a week? Now is the third day hair: it's quite good, softly oily. Tonoight I'm plannina carrot/carrot juice hair mask as for refreshment. So hurray -- it's getting easier.
  Just curious to ask (was there a topic somewhere?) -- how do you usually wash out the oil masks with ''no poo' in you do them? Do you use soaps, shampoo bars -- if so, how is your hair after them? If you do an oll mask -- do you do it on clean or on greasy hair? Thanks in advance. :)

'No poo', water only, training hair -- questions
liza_di_grazia
  I've been 'no-poo' for over two years: I mostly used clay as a cleanser (the cheapest and most convenient and fastest way), and sometimes wheat-rye bread mixture. This is briefly. Story and questions.
Read more...Collapse )
 

No poo struggles
haley_kate
Hey everyone! I have been no poo for two weeks. Prior to no poo, I had been in the hospital where I couldn't wash my hair for three weeks, so I felt like that added to the clarifying and regulating of my sebum. I started using a BS wash just once a week. Between washes, I do a water only wash and ACV rinse for shine. My hair feels awful. It feels like straw. The length of my hair feels OK, but the ends are just horrid. I hate the water only washes because my hair just feels like wet straw when it's in the shower: it's heavy, rough, and the ends are horribly dry. I am so bummed because I felt like it was getting to where it's supposed to be. I tried an egg wash to restore the proteins and strengthen my hair, but it seems to make it 10X worse. HELP

Getting frustrated...
jim pam pb&j
moogan84
Hello all!
Just found this community, and I thought all of you would be able to help with your expertise.  I have been no-poo for 35 days.  Every 2 days I use a baking soda paste on my hair and let it sit (wash my body, shave my legs, etc.) and then rinse with apple cider vinegar.  I have really greasy hair that when I was shampooing I needed to wash everyday or my hair would become a big pile of grease.  My hair is still greasy.  I was hoping by day 35 I would have noticed some results, but I haven't really.  When I wake up my hair is still greasy and I am still doing the pony tail/hat hiding maneuver.  Any pointers that you guys have would be greatly appreciated.  I washed today and while my hair looks okay in the front, it's still feels greasy and the back looks greasy.  Thank you :)

Coconut Milk
volleyball
loveexhumed
So, there's no tag here for "coconut milk" so I found it hard to search. Anyway, wanted to get some opinions/comments on the use of coconut milk. I'm almost 2 years no-poo. Lately, with my BS wash, I've been struggling with dry hair and scalp and oily roots. Weird, I know. Like, the first day or so after washing would be fine, but then the length of my hair would get very dry, the roots would be oily, and my scalp would be flaky. I started reading about some people's experience with the base/acid combo Ph switching being too harsh on the scalp and decided to try a coconut milk wash. I found a few recipes online for coconut milk + Dr. Bronner's + oil (followed by a vinegar rinse) and tried it last night - LOVE IT! Now, it's only the first day, but my roots are clean and the length of my hair is soft and shiny. Can I expect this to last? What other changes to my routine do I need to make? Anyone done this yet?

Think I may have to start over...
donnic
Hi! This is my first post and - believe it or not, it's about a problem!
I have been No 'Poo for 11 days now. At the end of this post is a little run-down of my days since I started.
Everything was going as expected - greasy hair, itchy, more dandruff than normal - for my transition period.
Then, Friday, even though my hair had had a wash on Thursday and was fine, I thought "I know, I'll try and do an egg and lemon wash and then condition with tea."
NOPE.
It went ok. I rinsed and rinsed and only used cold water and was so so careful. I used the tea rinse and let the whole lot air dry. It smelt a bit lemony but there were no bits in it or anything. My hair tends to pick up smells easily.
Unfortunately, when I went to see my boyfriend, instead of saying "your hair smells glorious like lemon and tea" he asked me why my hair smelled like fish.
FISH.
Now, my hair feels lovely. My scalp appears clean and I even think it's helped with my dandruff. It's not a rinsing issue, I'm sure - I rinsed so many times with so many partings and there was nothing left in my hair when I got out. I also washed it again with conditioner last night, after realising how gross it was, and scrubbed the scalp and, while it was still wet, it was fine. Now, this morning, it's dry and has the weird lemon/egg/fish smell again.

HELP! If I can't get rid of the smell No 'Poo, I might just try a no cone shampoo or something. Honestly, it's pretty grim. I don't have any EOs to put in it, or a BBB (I use a plastic bristle brush at the moment, the BBB should arrive soon). I have no plans to ever put an egg in my hair again.

TueD0: Shampooed, blow dried. All the things you're not supposed to. Hair = lovely.
WedD1: No wash. Hair passable.
ThuD2: WO. Hair only hat-worthy upon waking up. Greasy. Looks pretty grim.
CO in evening, no cones. Better.
FriD3: Hair not a happy place to be. Greasy and dandruffy.
SatD4: Greasier. Dandruff less problematic. Itchy.
SunD5: Greasy, itchy, pain in the butt to do anything with. Dandruff. Everything.
MonD6: WO Morning. Looks ok. Bit greasy @ roots & underneath. Bit itchy.
TueD7: Greasy underneath & roots. Very itchy. Wore it down.
WedD8: Wore up. Pretty greasy all over esp under. Dandruff. SO ITCHY.
ThuD9: WO Morning. Down all day. Looks nice. Feels ok not under though. Some itching. Smells sebum-y.
FriD10: Egg and lemon wash. Green tea rinse. SMELLS LIKE FISH - WHAT. Panic - CO wash. Fixes it.
SatD11: Nope. did not fix it. Smells like fish again.

What do you do between washes?
writing, fashion
ashes_to_roses
I've just started to gradually go no-poo. While I'm familiar with the basics, the actual practice is completely new to me.

I used to wash my hair every 2 days. What I'm trying to do is gradually spread out my washes. Has anyone else done this? At the moment, I'm currently on every 3 days, and next month I'll be every 4, etc. My shampoo is currently Nature's Gate brand Tea Tree shampoo (no sulfates listed). I also have some Dove shampoo, which I should use up since I'd feel bad about not using it after spending money on it. I'm thinking I should use up the Dove and move onto the more natural tea tree shampoo (which has cut back on my dandruff itch,btw). Correct me if I'm wrong; I'm completely new here.

Has anyone else here done a gradual step away from shampoo? Did you do any rinses between? A year ago, while I was still on conventional shampoos, I tried a chamomile rinse instead of conditioner and my hair felt fantastic. Since then I've heard good things about green tea on hair.

I'm at a loss because, at the moment, I'm struggling with the oily smell, and I think it's coming from a waxy buildup. I think my fine, wavy hair is getting used to not getting as much shampoo otherwise.

EGG wash questions
nurselily
I have been no poo for 2 months 1/2

-I have Light brown passed my clavicle length hair
-Fine strands but a lot of it
-Straight with the smallest wave only if I air dry (blow dry without brush yields very straight hair)
-Normal sebum production. (when I shampooed I would only do it every 3 or 4 days)

I have been using a mix of BS 1 tblsp for 2 cups of boiled water to wash and DWV or tea or diluted lemon juice as acid rinses. ACV weighs my hair down.

Yesterday I drenched my length and ends omitting my scalp with coconut oil and let it absorb for a whole day.
Today I did my first egg wash using 3 eggs 1 tbsp of lemon juice and a bit of water. Put it in my scalp and length and rinsed with cold water. Air dried.

Now my hair feels dry and frizzy. (even though I did an oil mask for the whole day before) It had been 6 days since my last wash. My hair is not soft, not silky. People say egg does miracles to their hair. but not me.

I'm curious why it didnt work well.
Has anyone had similar results as me?

Loving no'poo
tash930
Been no poo for 11 days now, not that long considering I normally would only wash my hair once a week, but I think I have discovered something that gets rid of grease. My hair started to get greasy two days ago, I tried to ignore it, but with school tomorrow I decided I had to do something!
My hair is short, the water here is hard and last time I tried the baking soda wash my hair went mental. I got into the shower this morning and with just water rubbed my hair, a lot. It was disgusting to feel that grease on my hands. When it was wet it felt so sticky and thick and heavy but to dry it I rubbed it with a towel, a lot. And bam. Grease no more.
I don't think doing this is a good idea with long hair, I have heard a lot about getting split ends if you rub your locks too much. But if you have short hair, you might as well try it, my hair is definitely not damaged.

I'll do progress entries as time goes on. Happy no'pooing!

Too much olive oil
rapistbanana
Hello,

I'm in my 3rd week of no poo method now and i'm very happy with the results. I'm using only water. But yesterday i tried an olive oil and egg mask and i rinsed it thoroughly but i still didn't get rid of it. My hair is ectremely greasy, from root to tip, I tried washing it with with mint tea as well since i read that it balances the ph of your scalp but it still looks like it has never been washed in its entire life!

heeeeeeeeeeeelp!!

It's been fun, but...
gauraprema
Hi all,
I've been no poo for about a year and 8 months. I've really enjoyed my experience and got some wonderful results, but I seem to have reached a point where I've encountered several issues and don't know what to change in my routine anymore. If I don't do something different quickly, I might have to give it up entirely.
Let me explain myself... First of all, this is my current routine :
I wash twice a week.
Once with 3/4tsp BS dissolved in boiling water followed by a nettle tea rinse, containing about 2 tsp of white vinegar. I also add EO such as Tea Tree, Rosemary, Lavender and Lemon.
For the other wash, I use 3 egg yolks blended in about a cup of water, followed by the same rinse as before.
My hair is fairly long, thick and very straight.

Now what has been problematic lately, is that my ends are breaking A LOT. I never used to have split ends before I went no poo. They started turning white too, and it's pretty noticeable. So I went ahead and got a haircut about two weeks ago, and they are already starting to turn white again. I'm pretty upset about this, as I want to let my hair grow. I get the feeling that the Baking Soda is causing this, as it seems to be the most "harsh" product I'm using. I also get dandruff every time I use BS, so it seems to be an overall irritating factor.
Also, the length of my hair is very waxy. It wasn't always like that; there were periods where my hair looking really nice allover. But now, after I've washed it, the part close to my roots looks really good but not the rest. It's not to bad because I braid it, but I would still like to have the option of wearing it down when I feel like it! It's also definitely more waxy after the BS wash than the Egg wash.

The thing is, I can't give up BS and use only eggs. That would be too many (6 egg yolks a week?) and too expensive! And I've tried adding more time in between washes but my hair gets the greasy look very quickly. Also, when I have dandruff, I can't stop myself from scratching my scalp and it really needs to get cleaned regularly.

So, what can I do? I tried Water Only, and it looks absolutely terrible. Greasier coming out of the shower than beforehand. Adding more BS will make it more irritating for my scalp and my ends; I would not risk that. I have a Boar Bristle Brush, but as soon as I start using it gets covered in wax. That means I have to wash it every time I use it. So I don't end up using it a lot.

I've been thinking about shampoo bars, maybe? Any other suggestions? Ayurvedic herbs seem a little bit complicated. I don't have that much patience...
I thought I could find the "perfect recipe" for my hair and just keep using that, but it's reacting differently all the time! And lately, I've been very unsatisfied with the results. After almost two years of adapting quantities, testing different methods, I feel like I've run out of ideas.

Water only.
Woman Clothed In The Sun.
00smittenkitten
OK so I seemed to have transition into water only from BS/ACV over the last couple of months and was looking for some hints and tips on how to really get my hair looking great with water only.

I'm wetting it once to twice a week at the moment, it looks good on the first day, but it seems to lack luster by the next morning and seems a bit limp there after.

What can I do differently?
runty_cobra
Hello! I've been no-poo about 5-6 months. The first 1-2 months I used the BS/ACV method (I honestly don't remember what the ratios were). My hair did NOT respond well. I got down to using it every 3 days and was doing WO washes everyday in between because, well, I just like to start my day with a shower and I find it refreshing to at least wet my hair. ANYWAY, It completely dried out my roots/scalp and left a weird residue. My hair felt coarse and brittle, so I stopped, did some research and tried a honey wash. I was still following it with an ACV rinse.

I use roughly 2 tbsp of honey mixed with about 12 oz of warm water (just warm enough to be able to mix in the honey) and the ACV rinse is made exactly the same way, though I tend to go a little heavy handed with the honey and light handed with the ACV. I use both of these 3 days a week (basically every other day M-F and skip weekends as I don't care as much how my hair looks) and am still doing WO everyday, except once in a while on the weekends I won't shower at all.

It's not so much that I am unhappy with what I am doing now, but I'm also not happy I just feel I could be doing something better. My hair doesn't look bad but I'm not seeing the results I want to be seeing. I also want to go longer in between but my hair gets sooooo greasy. I also find when I don't do my WO washes everyday my hair is limp and looks even worse.

I have long, very wavy hair that is what I would call normal thickness. I have browsed these forums a bit looking for tips but it seems that everything I find basically just tells me that everyone's hair is different, which I completely agree with but it is leaving me feeling overwhelmed. I found some great tips that I was thinking about trying, using ACV rinse less often (not every time), should I stop rinsing my hair everyday even if it's WO?, glycerin instead of ACV rinses, maybe doing a BS wash once or twice a month, I'm just not sure where to start... I was also finding a surprising lack of people who use honey washes, is this a no-no? I LOVE my honey washes, I wouldn't mind adding something to them (maybe lemon?) but I can't imagine dropping the honey, I use raw local honey for most of my beauty care routine, raw honey is amazing. but i guess that's a separate topic, haha.

I'm looking for some tips or advice, thanks in advance :)

Just starting no poo
Bill Peace_1
outragme_982

Good afternoon!

I've decided to jump into the no poo method and give it a shot. I've been primarily a once a week washer as it is, so the idea of my hair getting greasy during a transition phase doesn't really bother me at all. I'm a stay at home mom so I don't have to worry too much about my hair looking like crap for a while anyways. My hair is thinning and is perfectly straight and dark. I cut off about a foot of it last week so my ends are good and ready to start new.

I washed two days ago with a clarifying shampoo, and now I have some decent oil build up (as you can see), which is distributing really nicely down to my ends because I've been finger combing a lot. My question is this: when should I begin my first no poo wash? Should I wash tonight since I'm seeing oil? Or should I wait a week? I've read a bunch of methods but haven't seen a lot of info that gives a timeline of when to wash and when to wait it out.