the no 'poo method

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thick hair
vlameni wrote in no_poo
hi, i'm no poo for about 10 weeks now and i didn't really care much for the greasiness as i was thinking that it just needs time to get away, but i'm getting slowly worried...i was reading until now, that transition period takes about 6-8 weeks and i'm beyond that but my hair is not getting any better...
i have shoulder long extremely thick (i mean - really REALLY thick) hair with weird waves, so i had kinda always problems to get a normal hair cut. as i like to do experiments and no poo did catch my interest i was determined to try it out. i do use water wash only from the very beginning, didn't use BS or ACV or WV or anything since the beginning. my hair DOESN'T look better than before, it looks..well..it doesn't look greasy, but it doesn't look as fluffy as before and i used to love that previously. now i can't even let my hair down. i hate running my fingers through it as sebum sticks to my fingers and i end up with sticky greyish fingers. the same happens to my comb, i can wash my fingers and my comb of course, but well...i was hoping this would end some day and i would be able to live with wo wash only and without having greasy hair...
i'm lucky to find this community on this page as i found out, that going wo doesn't turn out that well for some people and the greasiness will eventually never go away unless i help it out. i tried to put cornstarch into my hair as sort of dry shampoo today, but my hair is so thick, that it just absorbed the entire cornstarch, didnt do a thing and when i tried to brush it out, nothing happened (except the usual amount of grey sebum)...i would probably have to use the entire package of cornstarch to see some effect :P
so, my question is, if anybody has experience with extremely thick hair and water wash only. i know my questions are very similar to many which have been written here before..but i just didn't find any suitable answer until now..i don't want to use any natural soaps, any soap bars, BC etc...getting back to shampoo is absolutely out of question. 
does my hair just need more time? or do i really have to start using some products? we have hard water at home, so this might be one of the reasons...or is it because of my thick hair?

I have thick hair and live in a hard water area too. I am personally unable to last the 6 to 8 week transition period suggested for water only. My hair just stays greasy and limp. Instead, I have switched from shampoo to a baking soda rinse once a week.

My goal is to do this for a few months and try water only again. I hope that kind of transition will help.

So far, I have been using baking soda (3 tablespoons of baking soda in four cups of water) for three weeks. My hair is really soft now, and aside from some flaking (which I had before anyway due to a dry scalp) so far, so good.

Getting your hair clean with water only takes a little bit of a different approach than just rinsing with water, like when you use shampoo.

First of all, it's really important to keep the tools you use on your hair really clean. It would mean daily cleaning of your hairbrushes / combs and using a clean towel specifically for your hair.

Also getting your hair and scalp clean will take extra effort in the shower. You will need to rinse with a strong jet of water, and really scratch off all the excess sebum of your scalp.

Mostly, when you go straight from shampoo washing to water only the transition period can be quite long. Most people find it easier to just slowly increase the time between shampoo-ing until they can go a week or two in between washes before they go water only. Give it more time, eventually you will figure out what works for your hair and go from there.

I was WO for a while and, to be frank, it didn't work out so well for me. I have very fine hair so grease shows very easily; mine's not super-thick but I have kind of a lot. But, some things made a difference between "bleh" and awful.

1) Water pressure. You're going to need *something* to get the stuff off of your scalp, if you're not using product.

2) Scrubbing. See 1).

3) Cool/cold water conditioning rinse. If you've ever noticed, when you get your hair cut at the salon, the conditioner usually ends up getting rinsed out with cold water. That's because it forces the "scales" of the hair to lay flat, which I guess keeps the hair's natural oil from leaking out?

4) Stop touching your hair. Think about all of the oil on your skin.

5) Some people have mentioned an improvement with cleaning their pillow cases more often or some such, but this I don't know about as much as the other four.

Good luck!

Going straight from shampoo to WO is pretty drastic! I think you may need a mild degreaser to help you along until your hair and scalp adjust. Your options include 'cone-free conditioner, BS (try a mild solution, say 1 teaspoon to one cup water), tea rinses, rice water, or any number of other things you'll see in the tags.

My hair is thin, but when I went from CO to WO, I found that I still needed to scrub with something once every week or three to keep the grease from building up. I use applesauce, which works great for me, but fair warning: it's really hard to rinse out all the little gummy bits.

Hard water is definitely also not helping your situation. Check out that tag for some suggestions for dealing with it!

you may have to start using something, because if you are WO and the build up isn't going away, i don't think continuing to do WO is going to make it go away.
I do BS then acv rinse once or twice a week, and on in between times i do WO with an acv rinse. I have sebatious dermatitis so my head gets very itchy if i don't wash my hair at least every other day, and using BS that often makes the hair really dry. through the week i can start to notice the build up of sebum, and after the BS wash it's cleaner.
maybe you'll find you need the BS wash even less.. maybe once every week and a half or something. i started out using it every other day, but started going WO after a while because it was getting to be too much.

thanks for all your replies...i'm a little bit afraid of BS as with wrong usage it can damage the balance of the scalp...i wash it quite frequently, maybe every 3rd day and it didn't get itchy until now, i have a little flakes but nothing horrible i can live with that...
im kind of really disappointed as i was reading a lots of success stories about WO and was fond of the idea that all i have to do is to wash my hair with water...i guess i had a wrong idea of the whole thing.
water pressure is really poor at my home, so i think in combination with hard water this could be the real problem here...i'm gonna try the acv or wv wash tonight to see if it will improove anything at all, or maybe the tea thing or nettles....
i refuse puting any shampoo or conditoner onto my hair if not absolutely necessary, even if it would say its natural and organic. it would be a huge fail for myself just to give up and start using some commercial products again :)

There's no reason to be afraid of BS. I don't know what people are talking about damaging the balance of the scalp but you would have to have pretty excessive use. I use a teaspoon to a cup of water, and that's usually good for two washes. Plus, if you're using an acidic conditioner, that'll balance against the alkali nature of the BS. If you wash every third day, you should be fine using BS.

I'm not totally for-sure about this, but I have gathered that some who consider their regimen WO still use some kind of acid dilution to rinse. In other words, maybe the tea/vinegar/nettles will do you right?

My hair is extremely thick, wavy, and tends toward coarseness - but it LOVES no-poo! I started out with BS/WV, and eventually dropped the BS. I will say that high water pressure helps me a lot - because of the sheer volume of it - and a wide-toothed shower comb has been *essential* but I did just stay at a hotel with really low water pressure last weekend, and my hair turned out fine.

How come you're screening replies? Just curious!

@ clothmother: wha do you mean with screening replies? i'm new here so i have no idea :D

You posted this with the options that new replies are "screened," as in only you and the poster can see them until *YOU* personally unscreen them. There's a button for that somewhere in the bar with the username and userpic.

It's either you or a community mod who has to do it, anyway. But I think it's probably you.

it should be ok now..?

so all of you think, that i definitely need to use something? i can't really believe, that the hair is not able to adapt and stop producing such amount of sebum, when it finds out that it's not necessary...
how were our ancestors solving that problem when there was no access to soap/shampoo..or how do the tribes, that still live in the rainforrest somewhere, manage to stay clear? i really doubt, that their hair is full of grey sebum and is greasy or waxy or anything what we experience here..

Well they probably just didn't/don't care because they didn't/don't have to worry about society judging them for looking "dirty"/unattractive?

Also, soap is pretty old, recall—dating back to animal sacrifices in Ancient Rome, at least in the West. Any country/society that has access to lye/animal fats can theoretically get soaps, and soap can wash your hair, too.

It takes everyone's hair and scalp a while to recover from all those years of trying to defend itself from shampoo.

By the way, you might find this post interesting. It's about 19th century hair care!

wow, thanks for that article. its very interesting!

Hello, as others have posted, when you do WO, you need to mechanically remove the sebum etc from your hair, instead of letting the shampoo do it. I wonder if this is taking a long time, because you have so much hair? I am WO, have been for about the same amount of time as you, and have hard water, but my hair is definitely transitioning. It looks normal now, even if it still feels a bit waxy.
So my tip would be to use a fine toothed comb and divide your hair up under the spray (nice and hot to help melt the sebum), and rub each lock of hair from root to tip, to help the sebum move away from your scalp. And then just very occasionally, use one of the acidic rinses to make sure no limescale from the hard water hangs around. I always finish with a cold water rinse.
There is a long hair forum on LJ that you might want to look up, as although your hair isn't that long, it might be that you need long hair techniques with it being so thick.